Tagged: uncanny valley

Cours de philosophie 2

Après une introduction assez substantielle (Cours de philo), un cours de mise en jambe avant du plus lourd.

Ce cours, tiré de mon activité de blogueur, est composé de quelques réactions qui furent les miennes à la lecture de textes philosophiques de deux autres blogueurs.

*

Tout d’abord, une réponse à un blog qui n’a pas daigné ou osé publier cette réponse et dont j’oublie le nom, réponse à une présentation de la pensée du philosophe Hans Vaihinger (1852-1933).

Je ne suis pas certain – et cela rend d’autant plus intriguant pour moi le fait que ses sources soient « principalement Kant et Schopenhauer » – que l’espèce d’utilité cognitive que dessine Vaihinger ait vraiment un sens. De prime abord, je crois retrouver des échos du « Tout est bon » qui caractérise l’anarchisme épistémologique de Feyerabend (c’est-à-dire que c’est la pensée de Feyerabend qui en serait l’écho, car plus tardive, bien que Feyerabend ne me paraisse pas citer Vaihinger dans son Contre la méthode).

Kant, de son côté, souligne certes l’utilité des sciences positives (empiriques), ce qui a néanmoins chez lui deux sens qu’il convient de distinguer.

Le premier, le plus connu, est que ce terme d’utilité vise à souligner a contrario les fruits d’une critique de la métaphysique dévoyée – toute la métaphysique traditionnelle –, en indiquant l’intérêt d’un usage empirique de la raison dans les sciences positives, à savoir que cet usage est utile.

Le second sens est que la science empirique est utile même si en soi la connaissance empirique est à jamais incomplète dans la synthèse continue des connaissances relatives à la nature. (À cet égard, l’expression de « connaissances cumulatives » est une feuille de vigne, une pudeur de l’entendement, car la réalité est simplement qu’il n’y a rien d’apodictique et donc rien d’autre qu’une roue de hamster intellective dans ce domaine de la pensée.) Kant ne valorise donc pas cet utile, et la remarque de Carnap selon laquelle Kant, penseur des sciences, n’a pas cherché grand-chose dans les sciences et la méthode scientifique elles-mêmes (à part une théorie des nébuleuses dont les savants lui font encore crédit), est très pertinente, plus même que Carnap ne s’en doutait.

L’utile, en dehors de domaines particuliers considérés, ne peut être défini que par le biologique et est donc en philosophie une notion complètement bogus. La science n’est même pas utile : les primitifs se reproduisent tout autant et même plus, donc leur état est caractérisé par une plus grande utilité que l’état civilisé. – Et la rhétorique kantienne de l’utilité de la science est palpablement un artifice, une ficelle dans le projet de Kant d’éloigner les esprits de l’étude de la métaphysique traditionnelle.

*

Les autres textes qui suivent, en anglais, sont tirés d’échanges avec la blogueuse maylynno (Lien vers son blog), professeur de philosophie et poétesse libanaise (qui blogue en anglais). Les citations sans indications d’auteur sont de maylynno.

Perhaps it’s secondary to the content, the length and the style in philosophical writings is still a dilemma. What are the reasons behind this issue and is there a mold to respect?

From Alain’s extremely short and concise Propos to Kant’s ponderous yet not verbose in the least bit Critique of Pure Reason, all formats may indeed do in philosophy.

Yet there’s a domain where long-windedness seems to be the rule, and a detrimental (but inevitable?) one:

‘’Dijksterhuis and van Knippenberg (2000) demonstrated behavioral effects of activation of the stereotype of politicians. In pilot testing, they had established that politicians are associated with longwindedness. People generally think that politicians talk a lot without saying much. In an experiment, Dijksterhuis and van Knippenberg activated the stereotype of politicians with the use of a scrambled sentence procedure for half of their participants. Subsequently, participants were asked to write an essay in which they argued against the French nuclear testing program in the Pacific (this experiment was carried out in 1996). As expected, participants primed with politician-related stimuli wrote essays that were considerably longer than did control participants.’’ (Dijksterhuis, Chartrand & Aarts, in Social Psychology and the Unconscious, 2007, John A. Bargh ed.)

*

Whether global warming needs urgent and immediate actions, it is high time we let go of the past in order to face the future. What past are we talking about? Traditions and religions.

Let’s call tradition your ‘’traditions and religions.’’ Your programmatic call has already been taken up: By science – the very hard science that is burning our planet Earth to ashes. Science has assumed a dogmatic guise wholly uncongenial to its very essence; scientism is in truth the hopeless and embittered realization that the relativity of empirical knowledge (in the continuous synthesis of empirism) cannot fulfill the metaphysical functions of tradition.

In Heideggerian terms, science is not even so much relativism as outright nihilism. In that view, tradition would have to be re-understood, which means two things. First, tradition must be re-understood over the nihilism of hard science that has colonized modern Man. Second, to re-understand tradition means to understand its dialectics, which is to say that the actual tradition of our traditional past and present is not tradition yet.

*

One might consider that thoughts or « a thought » is not a philosophical object to begin with, but a sociological one, what German psychologist Karl Marbe called a ,,Fremdeinstellung,’’ or borrowed attitude/disposition (ingrained, customary or transitive, through suggestion, priming, education, hypnosis and what not): More often than not a thought we call ours (‘’My thought is…’’) is a replicate of a thought from amidst the group we live in. These are thoughts in the sociological sense; philosophy being, in this context, meta-cognition, the way one deals with one’s sociological thoughts – which, as Heidegger stressed, is bound to remain impractical in every sense of the word.

*

That there be any individual benefits in reading philosophy is a moot point, and my conclusion is that this is why it should be made compulsory reading at one stage or other of one’s schooling.

The most obvious answer to the question about what the benefits of reading philosophy are, is, following Heidegger, that there are none for the individual: He or she will be no worse a cog in the machine if he or she completely lacks philosophical culture (or even, plain and simple, culture, as philosophy is part of culture). Yet when one gets acquainted with culture and philosophy, one needs it as one needs oxygen. There are no benefits but only one more need, and this is the need to be a human in the full sense of the word. Were it not compulsory during one’s education to read philosophy and work on these readings, in most cases one would not wish to get acquainted with it, precisely because the benefits of it are immaterial on the monetary market that we tend to see as “our future” in this life. Even when compulsory at some point, philosophy is discarded by many when the subject is no longer required for grades (and for getting in the marketplace). One underlying reason may be that, as the Hungarian economist Tibor Scitovsky once put it, “Culture is the occupation of the leisure class.” Where one’s vocation is to be a cog in the machine, philosophy has no place.

That the activity of thinking should make some people roll their eyes is no surprise, as it comes as no surprise either that sometimes feathers fly when a wealthy bank manager hears his son telling him he wants a degree in philosophy or in other “humanities.”

*

‘‘I think philosophy should be marketed in order to be read/learned. Philosophers never really market themselves because they are above this and I agree with them. However the world today functions with marketing. While some silly stuff are followed by millions, I don’t see why we should not market philosophy and make it (look) accessible.’’

It happens already – philosophy is marketed – and I’ll tell you how this is done, from what I see. There is that wealthy banker or industrialist; his son had his own way and studied philosophy instead of the business of trading bonds and securities. This son of his, not too brilliant as a matter of fact, has got his degree in philosophy anyway. What is he going to do now? His daddy picks up the phone, calls the manager of the weekly newspaper that his bank or holding owns, and tells him or her: “I want a column for my son in your paper.” Aussitôt dit, aussitôt fait! A new “influencer” is born, an abortive mind of rabidly conservative tendencies.

People who ask what the point of studying philosophy is, deserve no reply, or the reply of one’s shoulders shrugging. Among the very few things I find good in my country is that philosophy is (well, not sure that I shouldn’t have to say ‘’was’’ in fact, this is something I must check) compulsory for all students at least a couple of years till the baccalauréat.

*

Xennials

Thank you for introducing this new object, Xennials, to my noetic sphere.

Albeit I am no buyer generally speaking of such overgeneralizations, I tend to see a statement like “Xennials are described as having had an analog childhood and a digital adulthood” as relevant, being under deep influences from the side of Marshall and Eric McLuhan (media ecology). Yet, although I understand that a characteristic such as multitasking skills may be logically inferred from statements about technological environments, I fail to see the link with “ambition,” or the alleged “unbridled optimism” of Millenials, an optimism I do not observe (especially since dispositions acquired during childhood are always subject to adjustments to current situations and in many countries such dispositions are bound to be blasted by events such as skyrocketing levels of poverty).

As to the present technological environment, my own view is that today’s kids are growing up along a virtual reality at the stage of the ”uncanny valley” (Masahiro Mori), that is, too realistic to be taken as the pixelated fairy tale it used to be when I was a kid (bordering with Xennials on the older side) and yet not realistic enough to be interchangeable with non-virtual reality. This uncaniness of computer-generated imagery (CGI), Actroids, etc, may be warping their tender minds, perhaps creating in the long run a deep-seated hatred toward all things virtual, and a willingness, so to speak from the cradle, to develop Blade-Runner tests for the ultimate sparks of uncaniness in the insurpassable Androids of the future, while, on the other hand, all animal life will have disappeared in repeated mass fires, animal life in the mirror of which human minds find a neverending spring of emotional upheavals. When nature won’t be surrounding us anymore but we will be surrounding nature, owning it like a fish tank in a living room furniture, we will have lost, as Kant would say, our sense of the sublime, all generations alike from that time on to the end of times. Paradoxically, when there is no nature (natura naturata) any longer but a ‘’fish tank’’ zoo, Man is bound to lose all sight of his supernatural vocation.

*

Aesthetics 1

Colors are the antidote to a modern world of greyness. This especially has been, after years of classicism militancy in the fine arts, what led me to modify my appreciation of contemporary art, namely its colourness as antidote (as well as its abstractness as antidote to perceptual overload).

As often, though, Kant’s philosophy serves as a mitigating factor here again, as he describes the value of fine arts as being in the drawing, colours being the lure (inferior). Quoth:

“En peinture, dans la sculpture, et d’une façon générale dans tous les arts plastiques … c’est le dessin qui est l’essentiel : en lui, ce n’est pas ce qui fait plaisir dans la sensation, mais seulement ce qui plaît par sa forme, qui est au principe de tout ce qui s’adresse au goût. Les couleurs, qui éclairent le dessin, font partie des attraits : elles peuvent certes rendre l’objet lui-même plus vivant pour la sensation, mais non pas beau et digne d’être contemplé.” (Critique de la faculté de juger)

*

Aesthetics 2

I used to worship Beauty. I was young.

Now whenever she shows up I am hurt.

Beauty makes me feel sad for the life I’m living.

Beauty, what have I done to you that I can’t look at you in the eyes?

It is a betrayal of Beauty when one feels called to it and yet withholds the offering, as with time passing by one looks ever more deeply into the inescapable. Sometimes, then, when a grown-up man hears a song, a simple song from a simple heart, he is deeply shaken, as he remembers the days when a song was all he needed and yet he turned his back to the song, letting the song pass by that was the meaning of his life. What’s worth the song, he asks to himself. He looks around and comes to the conclusion: None of this. Beauty blinds him again. Always.

*

All in all, I don’t think this Covid-19 pandemic will change anything in depth, that is, we will not stand corrected. We’ll find a vax and then conclude that quarantines aren’t needed anymore, even though vaccination campaigns won’t prevent relatively high rates of yearly deaths in case the coronavirus becomes recurrent like the flu. The flu is killing between 300.000 and 650.000 people every year (10.000 in a country like France where the vax is available for free); did governements impose quarantines each year, the death toll of the flu would be far less (say 200 in France), but the economy would stand still. So the choice is made (although no one were asked their opinion about it) to sacrifice human lives each year so the economy can go on. We’ll simply add the death toll of Covid-19 to the figure (in case it too becomes periodic) and will have business as usual.

People who will have experienced hunger and participated in food riots, like in Lebanon and South Italy, and in lootings in the US, certainly are not likely to forget these days soon. But – perhaps because, as some social scientists would argue, I have an alienated personality – I don’t think the future will be shaped by the people themselves, unless a revolution occurs, as business interests are always in the mood of keeping things like they are. Of course even business interests will have to make some adjustments, for instance in the way they brace for such so-called black swan events like Covid-19 in the future (black swan event theory is a brainchild of Lebanese-American economist Nassim Taleb), or in the short run to the hyperinflation that some see coming, and if things go awry, then it means collapse, and then again, revolution.

*

1 Philosophy and Psychology
2 ,,Universätsphilosophie’’ and Philosophy

1/ The main difference between philosophy and psychology is that psychology being a positive science it is empirical throughout, whereas there is no such thing as a philosophy empirical throughout.

2/ “Philosophy is the study of the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence, especially when considered as an academic discipline.

True as far as the first part of the sentence is concerned, extremely dubious as to the rest.

As a matter of fact, the expression ,,Universitätsphilosophie’’ (university philosophy) reminds us that there is no congenial bond between the two. True enough, as early as the Antiquity philosophers taught at so-called Schools: Plato’s Academia, Aristotle’s Lyceum, the Stoics’ Portico… Yet at the same time, since Socrates they criticized the Sophists’ practice of having their teachings financially compensated. Which, I assume, means that a philosopher in, say, the Academia would not be paid. University professors being paid, they are the Sophists of our days. And the other distinction made by Schopenhauer, which overlaps the former, between those who live for philosophy and those who live of philosophy, stands. As was to be expected from these facts, Schopenhauer is hardly considered a philosopher by university “philosophers.” – All this bears no relation to anyone’s own personal situation, and I believe my readers are above taking my views as being personal regarding their situation. Kant was a professor too. (Schopenhauer explains that Kant could be a professor and a philosopher at the same time due to the ruling of an enlightened monarch in Prussia; and by this he was not meaning that in a democracy, then, university teachings would be free by mere virtue of a democratic Constitution.)

1 – I  may agree that psychology is not quite on par with physics, but this is only on a superficial level, given, at the core, the incompleteness of all empirical knowledge, its incrementality. As empirical sciences, both physics and psychology suffer from the same defect of being incremental knowledge providing at best an ,,analogon” of certainty.

Predictions based on exact sciences are in fact much more limited than usually acknowledged. True, when you start your car, you know it will go at your command, and this is due to scientific predictions upon which the apparatus is built up. Yet this is all we can do with exact science: to make technique out of it, that is, to harness forces in a predictable way — until the prediction is contradicted (by black swan events). It happens from time to time that a powder magazine explodes for no apparent reason, because of the particles’ Brownian movement which cannot be detected at the present stage of our technique; so these explosions are unpredictable, yet we are closing our eyes on the danger on which we stand. In the future we will find a way to predict these movements, but then still other events will escape our knowledge, ad infinitum, so progress amounts to nothing, it is only a change in conditions, not a progress in the true sense of the word, and that is true of the whole empirical field.

In this context, psychology is no different, and only ethical considerations have (allegedly) prevented us so far from designing apparata to predict and control human behavior based on the empirical knowledge of our psyche. Such apparata would, I believe, work as satisfactorily as a car does (only, we would have to deal with casualties there too, as we are dealing with road traffic casualties).

2 – When universities and schools are not free from all influences, philosophy professors are sophists because not only they hold a remunerated tenure but also they make believe philosophy is what the government, the authorities, the “Prince,” or any other interest-holding influencer, says it is.

If we look at the history of relationships between university and philosophy beyond the controversy involving Greek philosophers and sophists, we see that universities were created in the middle ages and that the philosophy taught in these institutions then was scholasticism, as the ‘‘ancilla’’ (maid-servant) of theology. Modern philosophy developed against Scholastics (Hobbes et al) and from outside the university. As far as modern philosophy is concerned, the connexion with university is therefore not foundational, but a late evolution, the turning point of which is Hegelianism. Yet the relationship remains shaky at best. To take only a couple of examples, Nietzsche left university at an early stage in his professoral life as an uncongenial environment, and Sartre, although his curriculum was the via regia to holding a tenure, chose quite another path (namely, a literary career and journalism), leaving no doubt,  in a couple of his novels, as to the paramount existential importance of this choice. Conversely, Heidegger made a brave attempt at justifying the position of tenured professor for a philosopher, namely, that “To teach is the best way to learn.” And I already talked about Kant. Kant and, in a lesser measure, Heidegger are the reason why I see the two distinctions, that is, between ,,Universitätsphilosophie’’ and philosophy, and between those who live of philosophy and those who live for philosophy, as overlapping greatly but not quite perfectly.

Thank you for your attention.

LIV Tamagotchi Omelette/Amulet

Prithee, tell her but a worky-day fortune. (Antony and Cleopatra)

*

« L’histoire est le développement d’une logique immanente dont les grands personnages historiques ne sont que les instruments inconscients ; ils sont animés par leurs passions et réalisent leurs intérêts ; ‘mais en même temps se trouve réalisée une fin plus lointaine, mais dont ils n’avaient pas conscience et qui n’était pas dans leur intention’. C’est ce que Hegel appelle la ruse de la raison. » (René Serreau, Hegel et l’hégélianisme, 1968)

C’est très exactement une idée de Kant.

[Ajout 8.8.2019 : Cette idée est exprimée en plusieurs passages de l’œuvre de Kant, de manière plus ou moins identique à la pensée ultérieure de Hegel ici présentée. J’ai pour l’instant retrouvé le passage suivant, qui montre d’ailleurs, citation à l’appui, qu’une telle idée de logique immanente dans le cours de l’histoire remonte à l’antiquité : « Ich meinerseits vertraue dagegen doch … (in subsidium) auf die Natur der Dinge, welche dahin zwingt, wohin man nicht gerne will (fata volentem ducunt, nolentem tracunt). » (Über den Gemeinspruch: Das mag in der Theorie richtig sein, taugt aber nicht für die Praxis) Je ne suis donc pas plus fondé à dire que l’idée est de Kant que Serreau à dire qu’elle est de Hegel, mais ce n’est pas non plus son but même s’il aurait pu souligner que l’idée n’est pas particulièrement «hégélienne»… Chacun d’eux l’a reprise à sa manière, en lui donnant un sens particulier au sein de leurs pensées respectives.]

*

« À partir du prix de revient total du produit [=coût total : fabrication, marketing…], on trouve son prix de vente en ajoutant une quantité qui sera la marge génératrice de profit. … Dans la plupart des cas, il s’agit d’entreprises fabriquant plusieurs produits : comment alors attribuer à chacun sa ‘juste part de couverture des charges fixes’ ? » (Armand Dayan, Le marketing, 1979)

L’auteur prend ensuite l’exemple d’une entreprise qui fabrique trois produits, dont l’un est suffisant pour amortir les frais fixes, et qui peut donc pratiquer des prix offensifs sur les deux autres produits. De toute évidence, une telle entreprise ne se spécialisera pas sur le produit A, même si B et C sont « estimés non rentables selon la méthode de prix de revient complet ».

Nous avons là un exemple de rationalité économique qui s’oppose à la spécialisation et donc à la théorie des avantages comparatifs, selon laquelle les nations ont intérêt à se spécialiser dans les productions où elles ont un avantage (absolu ou relatif), et sur laquelle les libéraux fondent le commerce international. Selon cet exemple, la théorie n’est donc pas viable même en pure rationalité économique et sans considérations extrinsèques de souveraineté nationale (qui exigerait le maintien de certaines industries même peu rentables), car la non-spécialisation peut comporter l’exercice d’un pouvoir économique sur les prix.

*

 « Qu’il évite avec soin tout acte qui dépend d’autrui ; qu’il s’applique au contraire avec zèle à tout ce qui ne dépend que de lui-même. Tout ce qui dépend d’autrui cause de la peine, tout ce qui dépend de soi-même donne du plaisir ; sachez que c’est là en somme la définition de la peine et du plaisir. » (Les Lois de Manou, traduction par G. Strehly, p.118)

Cela pourrait servir de résumé très exact de la doctrine des Stoïciens.

*

We’ll beat ‘em into bench-holes. (Scarrus, dans Antoine et Cléopâtre de Shakespeare).

Bench-holes est un terme archaïque pour désigner des latrines : « Nous irons les buter jusque dans les latrines. » Le Scarrus de Shakespeare anticipe donc de quelques centaines d’années la phrase du président russe Vladimir Poutine qui en a marqué beaucoup : « Nous irons les buter [les terroristes islamistes] jusque dans les chiottes. » Aucun commentateur, à ma connaissance, n’a relevé la référence shakespearienne.

*

Think of the fashion of London being led by a Br-mm-ll [Brummel]! a nobody’s son; a low creature, who can no more dance a minuet than I can talk Cherokee; who cannot even crack a bottle like a gentleman; who never showed himself to be a man with his sword in his hand, as we used to approve ourselves in the good old times, before that vulgar Corsican upset the gentry of the world! (Thackeray, Barry Lyndon)

So much for Barbey d’Aurevilly.

Au temps pour Barbey, auteur, comme on le sait, d’un peu convaincant Du Dandysme et de George Brummel, contredit par son congénère fictif, le gentilhomme Barry Lyndon.

*

People who say manual labour is a good thing have never done any. (Brendan Behan)

With the notable exception of Henry David Thoreau.

*

When the wise seer beholds in golden glory the Lord, the Spirit, the Creator of the god of creation, then he leaves good and evil behind. (Upanishads)

‘Good and evil behind,’ an early occurrence of Jenseits von Gut und Böse.

*

What is the amount of information needed to convince people that a personality is present? The answer … is that very little information is needed. Simple line drawings of objects (as long as they have eyes or even a hint that they are alive), are quite enough to activate psychologically rich responses. Perceived reality does not depend on verisimilitude: A character doesn’t have to look anything like a real person to give and receive real social responses. (Byron Reeves & Clifford Nass, The Media Equation, 1996)

Il n’est donc pas besoin de construire des robots sociaux qui ressemblent à l’homme, surtout avec le risque d’entrer dans la vallée inquiétante (uncanny valley) ! Des personnages à la Nintendo première génération, néoténiques et kawaii, peuvent suffire à créer une interaction sociale homme-machine optimale.

L’avenir seul pourra dire si l’actroïde est capable de sortir de la vallée inquiétante. Je fais l’hypothèse suivante. L’apparence des robots humanoïdes ne cessera de s’améliorer mais il existe une limite indépassable qui les maintiendra toujours à la périphérie de la vallée inquiétante, c’est-à-dire que plus la familiarité avec le robot le plus parfait sera grande et plus son « étrangeté » de robot deviendra manifeste à son interlocuteur humain, qui aura dès lors à trancher s’il a affaire à un robot ou à un humain quelque peu dérangé nerveusement.

*

And the joy of work, too. … people here don’t know anything about that either. … people here are brought up to believe that work is a curse, and a sort of punishment for their sins. (Ibsen, Ghosts)

Dans la bouche d’un peintre… (Aurait-ce été convaincant dans la bouche d’un ouvrier soumis aux nouvelles conditions du travail industriel ?)

Cette apologie libérale du travail, ingénieusement opposée à une conception chrétienne, reflète selon moi le statut d’Ibsen comme écrivain subventionné par le Parlement bourgeois norvégien qui lui vota une indemnité à vie.

*

Kantisme (notes)

1/ Raison pure

« La géométrie nous apprend que la droite tangente au cercle touche ce cercle en un point, mais si nous traçons le cercle et la droite sensibles, nous nous apercevons que la droite touche toujours le cercle en plusieurs points et que jamais nous ne pourrons obtenir une figure conforme aux définitions mathématiques. Or la géométrie ne peut, pour raisonner, se passer de la considération des figures, dont le tracé dément le discours que le mathématicien tient sur elles. » (Exposé de la pensée de Protagoras par Gilbert Romeyer Dherbey, dans Les sophistes, 1985) – Or c’est la construction synthétique a priori qui sert au géomètre et non l’aspect des figures tracées à la main, forcément grossières par rapport à ces constructions a priori. Contre ceux qui parlent des figures géométriques comme des approximations, des abstractions des objets perçus, lesquels s’écarteraient tous plus ou moins de la forme géométrique pure (Locke, Husserl), il convient de faire remarquer que la lune perçue dans le ciel nocturne est un cercle parfait et que l’horizon perçu est une parfaite ligne droite. Ce constat des formes géométriques pures perçues (intuitionnées) confirme l’affirmation kantienne selon laquelle une figure géométrique est une construction dans l’intuition et non une idée abstraite.

Le concept d’un triangle est sa pure et simple définition, et les énoncés qui posent cette définition sont analytiques. Synthétiques a priori sont en revanche les énoncés qui exposent les propriétés du triangle.

La dimension dite « quantitative/spatio-visuelle » des tests d’intelligence est conforme à la conception kantienne des mathématiques comme science intuitive pure.

La physique relativiste traite l’espace comme un concept et non comme une forme de l’intuition a priori.

C’est l’intuition du temps qui permet d’appréhender le changement, c’est-à-dire la prédication de termes contradictoires dans un même sujet (ici-pas ici) : l’intuition et non le concept.

Chacune des antinomies indécidables de la raison a une thèse (par exemple, le monde a un commencement dans le temps) et une antithèse (le monde n’a pas de commencement dans le temps). La thèse est appelée par Kant « dogmatisme » et a sa préférence : elle présente un intérêt pratique, et elle est conforme au sens commun (au « sens commun » d’un Chrétien, à la rigueur). L’antithèse est dite « empirisme » et Kant considère qu’elle est nuisible à la morale et à la religion. (Kant estime en revanche que l’intérêt spéculatif de l’empirisme est supérieur à celui du dogmatisme.) Schopenhauer adopte un point de vue opposé (en s’appuyant sur l’hindouisme et le bouddhisme) ; il affirme d’ailleurs que cette question du commencement ou non du monde n’est pas une antinomie car elle est selon lui tranchée (dans le sens d’un non-commencement du monde dans le temps).

2/ Raison pratique

La chose en soi n’étant pas soumise aux lois de la causalité, lois de la nature, elle est pensée comme libre.

La morale est une « logique » et non une science naturelle.

Considérer les phénomènes comme des choses en soi interdit de concilier la loi de nature et la liberté, tandis que la cause intelligible, en soi et en dehors de la série des phénomènes, peut être pensée comme une cause par liberté. Il y a ainsi deux types de causalité : selon la nature et par liberté.

« Comme pour toute marchandise, le capitaliste essaie d’acheter la force de travail le meilleur marché possible, car pour lui l’ouvrier n’est pas un homme devant vivre sa propre vie, mais une force de travail pouvant devenir source de profit. » (Cornélius Castoriadis, La société bureaucratique) On ne saurait mieux exprimer que le capitalisme viole constitutionnellement l’impératif « Agis de telle sorte que tu traites l’humanité comme une fin, et jamais simplement comme un moyen. »

*

That subtle appearance differences have reproductive implications is suggested by findings showing that the degree of female physical asymmetry is reduced when females are fertile compared to the beginning and end of the menstrual cycle, when they are not fertile (Manning et al., 1996). (Michael McGuire & Alfonso Troisi, Darwinian Psychiatry, 1998)

Les femmes sont plus symétriques dans leurs périodes de fertilité que dans les autres périodes de leur existence. C’est une confirmation des conclusions du baron de Saxy-Beaulieu : ,,Das Weib ist Plastik.’’ (la femme est plastique) (voyez ici).

*

« De manière générale les réparations, quelles qu’elles soient, n’ont bénéficié que de progrès technique faible (réparation de bâtiments, d’objets manufacturés, de meubles, d’horlogerie, etc.). » (Jean Fourastié, Le grand espoir du XXe siècle, 1949)

C’est pourquoi les réparations sont rares : on ne répare plus, on remplace, parce que la productivité des réparations n’a pas ou a peu augmenté. C’est aussi pourquoi la pression de notre civilisation sur les ressources du milieu s’accroît sans mesure.

*

A few people dream entirely in color. (Aldous Huxley, Heaven and Hell, 1956)

I have never dreamt in black and white. Never.

In fact I have never heard of people dreaming in black and white either.

Was color-dreaming rare in Huxley’s time because TV was black and white and people dream not after a real-life but after their screen-viewing pattern?

*

You’ve cheated me out of a mother’s joy and happiness in life. And a mother’s sorrows and tears too. And that was perhaps the greatest loss for me. (Ella Rentheim in Ibsen’s John Gabriel Borkman)

Compare with Nora Helmer’s ‘duty to herself’ in A Doll’s House.

Which quotation do people know, Ella’s or Nora’s?

*

A multitude of working poor

The height of it [Luxury] is never seen but in Nations that are vastly populous, and there only in the upper part of it, and the greater that is the larger still in proportion must be the lowest, the Basis that supports all, the multitude of Working Poor. (Bernard Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees)

Anyone who has read Mandeville knows he is not being critical here; on the contrary, his fable claims the necessity of heightening luxury.

Now let it be known that Mandeville was extolled by the Austrian School of Economics and Friedrich Hayek, intellectual seeds of the Chicago School.

*

Phobos is being drawn to Mars’ surface at a rate of one centimetre every year. At this rate of attraction, in something like fifty million years, it will smash into the surface of Mars. (Mission to Mars: The Emirates Mars Mission and Mars Hope, 2015)

So there is something after all in Hörbiger’s contention that celestial bodies are spiralling toward one another… => World Ice Theory (Welteislehre)

*

« Une onde se propage dans un milieu élastique entré en vibration sous l’action d’une force. L’air vibre et propage le son, l’air est le milieu élastique qui sert de support au son. Dans le vide, le son ne peut plus se propager. Le vide ! N’est-ce pas le vide qui règne dans les espaces interplanétaires et interstellaires que la lumière traverse à la vitesse de 300.000 km à la seconde ? Le vide serait-il donc un milieu élastique capable de transmettre l’onde lumineuse ? Une contradiction surgissait. » (Maurice Duquesne, Matière et Antimatière, 1968)

Une solution fut apportée par la théorisation d’une vibration de l’éther.

L’existence de l’éther étant infirmée par la physique relativiste, la contradiction resurgit ; comment la relativité la résout-elle ?

Une autre solution pourrait se trouver dans la « cosmogonie glaciaire » (Welteislehre) d’Hörbiger ou toute autre théorie qui, postulant l’absence de vide interplanétaire, n’a pas non plus besoin de l’hypothèse de l’éther.

*

Schopenhauer père de Darwin

« Revenu de son périple autour du monde, Darwin étudie les théories du philosophe [Schopenhauer] » (p.10), parmi lesquelles théories on trouve que

« Le chimpanzé a donné naissance à l’homme » (Édouard Sans, Schopenhauer, 1990, p.66)

J’ai déjà eu l’occasion de souligner que Darwin n’avait pas inventé la théorie de l’évolution des espèces, vieille comme l’antiquité, mais qu’il avait décrit de la manière la plus adéquate le mécanisme de cette évolution, à savoir la sélection naturelle.

Les milieux pseudo-intellectuels anglo-saxons ignorent largement ces données et tendent à colporter une histoire des idées falsifiée dans laquelle le darwinisme, né par génération spontanée, a introduit pour la première fois l’idée d’évolution.

En l’occurrence, les origines simiennes de l’homme se trouvent déjà dans Schopenhauer (x) et, Darwin ayant lu, comme on le voit ici, ce dernier, il a sans doute laissé dans ses manuscrits l’hommage qu’on s’attendrait qu’il rende à un prédécesseur dans l’idée que « l’homme descend du singe », idée que l’on attribue toujours à l’un et jamais à l’autre.

*

The history of the mammals in particular is a history of memory development. All through the Tertiary period, it is to be noted, brains in every group of mammals increase in relative size and complexity. With every increase, the power of learning from experience and of supplementing direct impulse by conditioned reflexes increases. (My emphasis) (H.G. Wells, The Outlook for Homo Sapiens)

Humans are more ‘conditionable’ than Pavlov’s dogs and Skinner’s doves.

*

Liberty Steak with Freedom Fries

America entered the war [WWI]. Those great newspapers which had been opposing the entry now suddenly discovered the seriousness of the German menace … Hamburger became ‘liberty steak,’ and sauerkraut became ‘liberty cabbage,’ and so the world was made safe for democracy. (Upton Sinclair, The Wet Parade)

And French fries became ‘freedom fries’ when the French refused to support the U.S. war in Iraq.

*

La « crise des fondements » des mathématiques (Hilbert, Gödel) est prédite par le kantisme et l’exposé des antinomies. Démontrer.

*

Matsui est une marque du groupe britannique Dixons-Currys au nom japonais en raison du marqueur associé à l’électronique japonaise.

Le slogan d’Audi « Vorsprung durch Technik », en allemand à l’international, est une idée de l’agence de publicité britannique BBG, en raison du marqueur associé à la technologie allemande.

Stella Artois est une bière anglaise. &c

*

L’effet Poetzl (ou Pötzl) de l’efficacité des images subliminales a été découvert grâce à des expérimentations sur la suggestion post-hypnotique. Poetzl observa que les rêves des personnes soumises à des images subliminales traitaient principalement le matériel subliminal. Il démontra ensuite que ce stock de « mémoire subliminale » peut influer sur le comportement : l’effet Poetzl, c’est que le jugement d’une personne valorise ou dévalorise des objets par association, en fonction de la mémoire subliminale.

*

Les séances publiques d’hypnose en tant que divertissement (stage hypnotism) ont complètement disparu, à l’instar des freak shows.

*

Abstraction vs Expressionnisme. La peinture abstraite n’est pas comparable à la musique atonale, qui est le pendant de la peinture expressionniste. L’abstraction est une réponse purgative à la « surchage perceptuelle » (perceptual overload) d’un monde surmédiatisé.

*

Le cubisme architectural d’Adolf Loos, inspirateur du Corbusier, a criblé l’Occidental, principalement mais pas seulement, de « flèches empoisonnées » feng shui.

*

As a rule making a living is boring to death.

*

Le lait maternel a un fort goût umami, mot d’origine japonaise, la cinquième saveur de base avec le sucré, le salé, l’amer et l’acide. Et le lait commercial ?

Selon la pensée chinoise, l’expérience gustative dépend de tous les sens, qui seraient au nombre de trente-sept.

*

 La machine à dire « Je t’aime » est le psychothérapeute de l’avenir.

*

Je demande à une amie thaïlandaise si elle nourrit son talisman Kuman Tong car j’ai connu des gens qui nourrissaient un Tamagotchi.

*

«The Entertainment Age cometh!» and it won’t be the Leisure Age.

*

We shall have plenty of time on our hands with which to do something. (John Neulinger, The psychology of leisure, 1981)

Qu’est-ce qui a démenti cette prédiction tellement courante il y a quelques années et à laquelle plus personne ne semble croire aujourd’hui ? L’inflation annulant les effets des gains de productivité ?

*

L’aristocrate est celui qui juge les gens d’après leur naissance, le démocrate celui qui les juge d’après leur diplôme.

*

La culture était la « spécialité » de la classe de loisir (Tibor Scitovsky). La fin de la classe de loisir pour les hommes, la femme y restant de fait, devait rendre l’homme méprisable, car inculte, aux yeux de la femme, d’où un violent désir d’« émancipation » par lequel la femme était conduite à demander à entrer comme les hommes sur le marché du travail en tant que main-d’œuvre spécialisée. Ainsi, et ainsi seulement, pouvait s’opérer la réconciliation entre les sexes, dans l’inculture généralisée.

*

Le statut est important pour le choix d’un partenaire de long terme, mais seul le physique compte pour le faire cocu. [C’est ce que j’ai appelé springboarding the Mogul => x]

*

« Kant ne savait pas de quoi il parlait quand il parlait des femmes. » Il en savait peut-être plus que le cornard moyen.

*

La consécration de l’intellectuel français : remettre un rapport à l’administration.

*

J’ai eu le culte du chef aussi longtemps que je pouvais croire devenir chef un jour. Aujourd’hui, je trouve cela de mauvais goût.

*

50 % de l’édition française est bonne à jeter ; le reste est traduit de l’anglais.

*

A right to insurrection supposes the right to call to insurrection.

*

‘Bags’ under the eyes are permanent (one has to remove them surgically), ‘shadows’ under the eyes are temporary (they disappear with better health). In films, successful, (moderately) mature men are depicted with conspicuous bags (thanks to makeup), women never (thanks to makeup). Bags, obviously, are not perceived as a marker of bad health in males. The cinematic practise surely relies on research (marketing research), so women must be looking for the bags (when in search of a springboard).

*

You feel blue because of your blue genes.

*

It is tempting to blame … self-interested advertisers for creating our desire for fats (Deirdre Barrett, Waistland)

As far as I’m concerned, I have never blamed advertisers for creating anything. But I am blaming them nonetheless.

*

I had a dream which I dare not tell my shrink. A gentleman is chatting with a lady at one or the other’s cosy place. Then she says she needs to use the restroom and accordingly leaves the living room. The camera stays on the man’s face while we’re hearing monstrous noises from the restroom, explosive flatulences and splashes, and that takes a little while. When the lady comes in again, the living room is empty, a window open, curtains waving: the man has jumped from it.

*

Je m’appelle Florent mais ça ne répond jamais.

*

The only thing science knows for sure is that it will kill all poets in the end.

*

L’homme d’une seule femme à cent têtes.

*

« Estoy triste » : c’est déjà relativiser.

*

Si Lucette avait su…

*

Très attendu au tournant.

*

L’université n’a pas voulu de moi car elle croyait que j’étais d’extrême-droite. L’administration m’a laissé entrer pour la même raison.

*

À vingt ans, j’ai failli mourir. À trente ans, j’aurais presque pu vivre.

*

Le pouvoir corrompt. C’est ce que nient les partisans de la dictature du prolétariat ainsi que les réformistes qui se présentent aux élections.

*

Le pouvoir corrompt (Montesquieu). Donc tous pourris.

*

C’est Tircis et c’est Aminte,
Et c’est l’éternel Clitandre… (Verlaine)

Clitandre, ce nom, en poésie, depuis Corneille (au moins), c’est une blague ? On ne connaissait pas le mot clito à ces époques, immédiatement évoqué dans tous les esprits aujourd’hui quand on dit Clitandre ?

*

As a true philosopher you thought you would be king.

*

Je n’écris pas pour être lu, mais pour être connu. Si les gens me lisaient, ils mourraient de honte. (Ah bon, j’écris ?)

*

How can you live, how dare you live after killing the poet inside?

There was a woman, it was my way to tell her: ‘You will give me nothing? I’ll give you everything.’ I sent her so many poems, then threw my poetry away.

*

Tu traverses une passe difficile de pantalons trop serrés.

*

J’étais devenu si conservateur qu’à la boulangerie je n’achetais plus que des baguettes tradition.

*

Le poète romantique se regarde pleurer. Le poète contemporain se regarde écrire…

*

Coups de tête au moment de l’orgasme.

*

Ce n’est pas rue de la banque mais rue bancale.

*

I should have died long ago, what went wrong?

*

Il n’y a pas de « vous » en anglais, seulement du « sir », qui ne doit donc pas être traduit par « monsieur » mais par le vouvoiement.

*

L’ami D. Q.

*

Oil rent is something for nothing.

*

Notre époque n’est pas héroïque car notre époque est bourgeoise, mais l’héroïsme existe car l’héroïsme est prolétarien.

*

Il tire la sonnette d’alarme et se prend un seau d’eau sur la tête.

*

Adventure de Jack London est un roman qui se passe en Polynésie. Les quelques allusions à la Polynésie française se bornent à dire la corruption de ses juges et bureaucrates.

*

Malcom X et Eugene X (Eugenics).

*

La poésie des peuples premiers ridiculise par sa profondeur tout ce que les universitaires occidentaux ont écrit sur leurs sociétés.

*

Tout ce que le poète écrit sera retenu contre lui.

Et tout ce que le poète écrit se retourne contre lui.

*

Le fonctionnaire français est jugé sur son enthousiasme pour les libertés auxquelles il n’a pas droit.

*

As there’s a First Lady, my neighbor asks, what number is my wife?